‘Hamartia’: a triumphant collaboration with the Byre Youth Theatre.

SONY DSCLast night, the Byre Youth Theatre’s Adult Collaborative Performance Group put on a wonderful performance of Hamartia, an original short play inspired by the themes and conventions of classical Greek Tragedy. The play was performed at the Barron Theatre in St Andrews before an invited audience. A group of four young actors from the local community devised the piece themselves, under the direction of BYT’s Stephen Jones. The piece was developed through discussions, talks and workshops on Greek drama and ritual led by Jon Hesk and Ralph Anderson from the School of Classics. The performance was part of a project funded by the University of St Andrews’ Knowledge Exchange and Impact Fund. For more information, blog posts, footage and stills on this element of our ‘Greek Drama in the Community’ initiative, keep checking our webpage.

Commenting on the production, Jon Hesk said: ‘Huge congratulations to the performers, Alice Linton, Cameron Melville, Gillian Campbell and Mirte Timmermans – you did a superb job! It has been a pleasure working with Stephen Jones and the group and we hope to continue collaborating with the Byre Youth Theatre in the future on other projects. We have learned a lot from each other. Thanks also to Lillias Chisholm for prop, costume, make-up and set design, BYT manager Ashley Foster and Lottie Haswell-West, the student manager of the Barron Theatre.’

Advertisements

Impact award for Jon Hesk and Ralph Anderson

Left to right: Jon Hesk, Ralph Anderson

Congratulations to Jon Hesk and Ralph Anderson , who have been awarded a grant from the University’s Knowledge Exchange and Impact Fund. The grant will fund continued work on a project called  ‘Greek drama in the Community’ involving work among others with with local schools and theatre groups.  In particular, Jon and Ralph will collaborate with The Byre Youth Theatre’s Adult Collaborative Performance Group via  a series of workshops as the group devises it own modern ‘take’ on the genre of Greek Tragedy.